CASMI

Dr Liz Morrell

Dr Liz Morrell

“The question of how society values new cancer treatments is an increasingly high profile one, and perhaps should be considered in the context of valuing treatment of other conditions which share some of the same characteristics. Through CASMI’s network of associates, we have the ability to engage with a range of stakeholders to break down barriers in the current system that prevent patients – any patients – getting treatments their doctors believe they need.”

Liz Morrell is originally a molecular biologist, studying at Cambridge and Glasgow universities, and recently completed an MSc in Health Economics from the University of York. She joined CASMI in April 2015 to investigate Health Technology Assessment of cancer drugs in a fellowship funded by Cancer Research UK.

Liz’s experience includes 10 years in pharmaceutical R&D – mostly over-the-counter products that are marketed directly to consumers. Although her initial roles were in product development, she gradually moved towards user research and market analysis to evaluate new opportunities and determine product entry strategies, particularly in the (then) exciting area of products switching status from prescription-only to broad availability. A role with an innovation consultancy followed, working with scientists across a range of disciplines to create and evaluate new business opportunities for clients based on novel technologies.

Liz then worked as an independent researcher as part of a career break, covering qualitative and quantitative research projects for companies, schools, research agencies, and consultancies. A large part of that work was qualitative research for the pharmaceutical industry, which focused increasingly on issues of funding, commissioning, and pharmaco-economics; a growing interest in this area led to Liz studying Health Economics, and joining CASMI to apply those skills in policy research.

When not commuting up the M40 to Oxford, Liz enjoys singing in chamber choirs and small groups, and covers most of the history of music through playing the recorder and the saxophone. She struggles to give as much time to the local dramatic group as she would like, goes running when she can’t think of an excuse, and is keen to improve her Italian.

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